July 23, 2008

MY MIND IS IN A TRANSOM STAGE TWO AND THREE

Yesterday I posted about a "mini transom" that I am creating and shared the first step in the process...picking your pattern or creating a design of your own. The next step is to choose your glass. This is where the sky is the limit! There are hundreds and hundreds of types of glass to choose from. Things to take into consideration when coordinating the glass choices is, texture, lighting application and the glass transparency.
Once your have made your choices you then cut the pattern pieces out (after making two additional copies) and adhering them to the glass. (I use a glue stick)
Placement of each pattern piece is also an issue. Glass only WANTS to cut in a straight line. Pieces with deep grooves and curves take several smaller cuts to achieve the pattern design.
When each piece has been cut I head on over to my "monster" as I like to refer to him...It is my glass grinder. I featured a picture of "him" in a past post....Each piece must be ground smooth along all of the edges and then washed and cleaned in preparation for the copper foil.
Here is a photo of the pieces I cut and ground for my first "mini transom". Tomorrow I will show you what the copper foiling application looks like.
Stained Glass artists all have their own "way" of mastering the art of stained glass. I believe that is where the word "art" comes into play...There really is no "right" way and "wrong" way to do things. Some methods may make your life a lot easier, granted...but in the end, it's all about enjoying the process. With Gratitude, Laurie B.

1 comments:

Pam Hawk July 24, 2008 at 12:21 PM  

Call me naiive... I always figured it took a lot of patience and skill to make a stained glass piece, but I had no idea just how much patience and skill - and a steady hand to make all the cuts - goes into each piece! And to think all the pieces have to fit together like a puzzle.
Very impressive.

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"All images and content of Laurie Beggin's Glass Musings and Through The Looking Glass © 2007 Laurie Beggin, unless otherwise noted."